The Mayor Pete Kennedy

 
The Mayor Pete Kennedy

Horror and resilience.

Monday April 15, 2013 started as a normal day. The sun was shining, the air was warm, people were going about their normal lives in America.  In Boston it was Patriot's Day, which commemorates the first battles of the American Revolution of 1775.  Schools and many businesses were closed on one of the biggest days of the year in the historic, iconic city on the water.  The Boston Red Sox played their annual holiday game and won at Fenway Park.  23,326 runners started the Boston Marathon with hope.  Sadly, only 17,584 officially finished the race after 2 explosions ripped through Boylston St., changing lives and America instantly.  As of this writing, 3 people died, including an 8-year-old boy. Over 140 were injured, many seriously.  The FBI has now taken the lead in the massive investigation of evil.  We all ask the same questions: why?  Why Boston? How can someone be so evil as to want to do so much harm to good people?  Sensibly we have no answers, because good people can not comprehend how such evil can be amongst us.  While we grieve and pray for those lost and injured, it is another wake up call to good Americans.  While we have remained relatively safe since Sept. 11, 2001, we can't be lulled into a false sense of security as was proven in the last 24 hours.  Yet, we must also be resilient and go about our everyday lives.  Look how New York has recovered in the last 12 years.  I was at the 9/11 Memorial on St. Patrick's Day a month ago, and it is a true testament to never giving up.  While we will never forget that day's brutal horror, new monuments have risen from the ashes as symbols of America's never ending spirit of patriotism and strength, while honoring those we lost and their families who soldier on in their memory.  While we today think with heavy hearts about what happened on 4/15/13 at the 4-hour-and-9-minute mark of the Boston Marathon, we must pledge, as we did on 9/12/01 to NEVER FORGET!   

 

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